12 Symbols of Love Found in Art History [Infographic]

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


Throughout history, cultures around the world have used an array of different symbols to depict love and affection, many of which ended up appearing in their art. Some representations, like the Irish claddagh, the harp, and the apple derive from ancient mythology and cultural folklore.

Invaluable created an infographic that explores these decorated symbols of love that go beyond the traditional hearts, roses, and chocolates. You may be surprised at how many of these symbols are still used today, in industries and disciplines including the visual and performing arts, antiques — even greeting cards!

Symbols of love in art history

Sources: Forbes | SlideShare | Fact Retriever | Ancient Pages | ThoughtCo. | Keen

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symbols of love found in art history
symbols of love found in art history


It's All in The Details — The Opulent Designs of The Chairs of Versailles

by Lindsay Shapka in , , ,


In the year 1668, Louis XIV began his expansion of a small chateau into what we now know as the opulent Palace of Versailles.

Every surface and object in the palace was painstakingly designed and created by thousands of artists in the Royal Academy, led by the three head designers — Le Vau, Charles Le Brun, and Andre Le Notre — in order to create a palace fit for the Sun King and his court of almost 20,000.

Visitors can now explore the palace and see for themselves, the bed that the king once laid upon, the Hall of Mirrors where he used to hold elaborate parties, and be dazzled by every gilded door frame, carpet, and chair.

The chairs of Versailles

Recently, art director, photographer, and artist Malorie Shmyr visited Versailles and found herself completely enthralled by the objects that fill the palace — especially by the many chairs that can be found throughout the hundreds of rooms.

Being engulfed in the opulence of Versailles left me trying to imagine what it would be like to live in a space where not one square inch was forgotten about.
 
I studied the every day objects in each room, imagining using them for their function instead of just an object on display. 

I honed in on the elaborately detailed chairs because it was exciting to see a normally humble piece of furniture dressed to the nines!

When Malorie returned home from her trip, she contacted me wanting to find a place to share the photos that she took of Versailles’ version of this every day object. Check out the details that she captured in the images below.

See more of Malorie’s amazing work on her website or on Instagram @malorieshmyr.

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The chairs of Versailles
The chairs of Versailles