10 Reasons Why I Love The Met In NYC and You Will Too

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


If you’ve never been to New York before, The Met (Metropolitan Museum of Art) might seem like it’s just another museum in the longgggg list of museums and art galleries that are on must-see lists for the city. But it is not just like the others, ohhhhhhh no my friend, it is not. 

Here are 10 reasons why you need to add visiting The Met to your New York travel list.

1. Visit The Met for three days on ONE ticket! 
Admission is free or "pay as you wish" for New York State residents. For all other visitors: $25 for adults, $17 for seniors, and $12 for students. Admission for all children under 12 and Members and Patrons is free. Note that any full-priced admission ticket is valid for three consecutive days at The Met Fifth AvenueThe Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters.

2. The Location
This sprawling, massive white building is perched on the edge of Central Park on Fifth Avenue in the Upper East Side. That means that views from its many windows are of the beautiful green space, and there are lots of paths for you to stroll if you need to take a break from a full day of wandering through galleries. 

3. The Quality of The Collection
The quality and diversity of the pieces at The Met are as good as, or arguably better than, those at The Louvre and The British Museum. Founded in 1870, it actually is home to one of the largest permanent collections in the world — more than 2 million objects, many of which are different than anything I have seen anywhere else.  

4. The Layout
The galleries cover an astonishing 17 acres! What I found incredible about the layout though, was how I never felt cramped or overwhelmed by the collection. Though the vast number of objects is staggering, they are displayed in a way that allows you to take everything in. As you wander through the different rooms, you will also find that each one is designed to reflect the antiquities that are inside it. Whether it is a Greek sculpture garden with soaring ceilings, a cozy Egyptian tomb, or a portrait gallery that feels like it's in the hall of a grand palace, you will feel completely transported. 

5. You Can Take Photos
Just like the art galleries and museums in Europe, photos are allowed as long as you don't use a flash. As an added bonus, a lot of the rooms have natural light, so taking photos without a flash doesn't pose as much of a problem as it does in the museums in Europe. 

6. The Egyptian Art
This wing was one of my favourites to walk through. There was an unrivalled collection of jewellery and adornments — necklaces, toe covers, hair decoration — and I loved the way it was displayed. The Temple of Dendur in this wing is an exhibit that is often used for special events, and you will recognize it from its appearance in multiple films. 

7. The Sculptures
I don't know about you, but I could sit and look at Greek and Roman sculptures for days. The way that bodies were carved out of marble to look so supple and soft that you imagine that it would feel like human skin if you touched them (don't touch them) is mesmerizing. And the multiple sculpture galleries at The Met do not disappoint. Make sure you spend some time in the European Sculpture Court and the gallery in the Greek and Roman Art wing.  

8. The Arts of Africa, Oceania & The Americas Collection
Spectacularly displayed, this is an unbelievable collection of work by Indigenous groups from all over the world. Artifacts vary from Mayan gold and carved Native American masks to ceramics from New Mexico and ceremonial ceilings from the tribes of New Guinea.   

9. The Restaurants
Not only is the food spectacular at the museum's many restaurants, but it is accompanied by stunning views overlooking Central Park. Don't miss the Great Hall Balcony Bar that is essentially a pop-up bar open only on Friday and Saturday nights from 4:30 pm – 8 pm. There are wine flights, cocktails, appetizers, and live music all set in the opulence of the Great Hall. 

10. There is More Than One Met! 
Yes, you read that right. The Met on Fifth is just one part (the largest part), of the collection. The Met Breuer houses a collection of art from the 20th and 21st centuries, and The Met Cloisters is dedicated to the art, architecture, and gardens of medieval Europe.  

HOT TIPS TO MAKE YOUR VISIT EVEN BETTER! 
–If you want to see the entire collection without feeling rushed or overwhelmed, you will need more than one day.
–Don't miss the gift shop! Especially if you are a lover of art books — there is a fantastic collection to peruse.

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When An Edmonton Art Gallery Turns Into A Lake: One of The Most Incredible Art Exhibits I've Ever Seen!

by Lindsay Shapka in ,


When the Peter Robertson Gallery described Canadian artist Steve Driscoll's show, And a Dark Wind Blows, to me as "a water installation that would reflect his paintings" and an unusual art exhibit, I wasn't sure what to expect. Maybe a few oversized tubs of water placed under the works? 

What I didn't expect was what I saw when I went to the preview — the entire gallery had been turned into a lake. 

Specifically, the floor of the gallery, and a few inches up the wall, had been lined with a heavy plastic that was then filled with water and dyed black. On top of this water, a wooden walkway, a dock, and huge rocks were placed to give viewers a way to enter, and walk through, the space. The walkway and dock were built so that they move slightly as you walk over them, causing ripples. The art, reflecting in the ripples, seems to move along the surface of the water. 

Visitors to the gallery must walk along a wooden walkway that leads to a dock

The works were all inspired by the night sky, and the show cumulated in a stunning three panelled painting of the aurora borealis, or northern lights (image below). Though the paintings are hung on the wall like they would be in any show, the viewer can not actually get close to the pieces in the same way that you could in a more typical space. Instead, you must stay on the walkway that guides you from work to work at a distance.

These Are Truly the Last Days by Steve Driscoll 




Spotlight On Swedish Artist Kent Lindfors

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


I was transfixed by the complex, layered, collage-like work by contemporary Swedish artist Kent Lindfors when I came upon it in a light-filled gallery at the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden. The collection on display was a retrospective of the artist's work from the 1970s until 2016. Kent Lindfors was born and works in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden.

According to the gallery, "his paintings resemble parts of an ongoing life-project, a never-ending journey in which the outflow of the river Göta Älv in the western sea blends together with Santiago de Compostela, and the sheds in Gothenburg harbour cross over into Catholic mysticism."

From afar, each works looks like it contains a singular image — from something as mundane as a rail car to a more complex religious motif — but the image is actually made up of words, smaller images, and layer upon layer of paint and collage. He spends years on each piece, reworking it, adding to it. His works are never really complete, but always a work-in-progress. 

The result is stunning. I could have stood in front of each piece for hours and still have not absorbed every detail, every nuance. 

Image Above: La Fuente, 2001-2013; The Well, 2000-2016; La Fuente II 2000-2016
Image Below: A massive wall collage showing a breakdown of the artist's process

The paintings were accompanied by snippets of the artist's writing. The excerpt above was my favourite. It's amazing how just a few lines of poetry can set a mode or evoke a vibrant image in your mind.

While no photograph can show the all of the intense detail that is in these works, you can see some elements in the image above titled The Wagon V, 1978-1979. 

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Why You Need To Visit The Gothenburg Museum of Art In Sweden

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


I recently paid a visit to The Gothenburg Museum of Art (aka Göteborgs Konstmuseum) in Sweden and was blown away by the incredible collection housed in this Swedish art gallery. The space contains an eclectic mix of historic works, Scandinavian art, contemporary sculptures, paintings by famous western artists, new work, and more.

The gallery spaces themselves are as unique as the work that they contain, making you feel like you are moving between buildings rather than just between floors.

The transition spaces between the galleries are also utilized in unique ways. Hallways are filled with collages of portraits (above), stairwells contain unique installations (first image below), and alcoves are the home of both historic and contemporary sculptures (second image below). 

Archive, 2014 by Michael Johansson

Double Blind, 2009/2014 by Charlotte Gyllenhammar

I was lucky enough to visit the museum during a weekday which meant that I was alone in most of the galleries. The sculpture gallery (below) was an especially impressive sight to behold. Turning the corner from the stairwell, you are faced with a vast room with a checkerboard floor that is filled with unique, large-scale pieces.

I was also surprised to see some incredible pieces by famous artists like Picasso, Munch, and Degas, as well as works that I had never seen before painted with a stunning use of light in the Scandinavian tradition. 

Youth from Gosol, 1906 by Pablo Picasso
Picasso's early work is my favourite. Most of these pieces are largely unknown, but the unfinished quality gives insight into the artist's process that I find fascinating and beautiful. 

Nordic Summer Evening, 1899-1900 by Richard Bergh

One of the best parts about the museum?

It's free to visit!

If you want to see the special, seasonal exhibition, there is a small charge, but you can see the majority of the collection without spending a single krona. 




"Show Me Something I Don't Know" — A Photography Exhibit Featuring The Anthrotorian's Photos!

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


When I saw that there was a call for submissions for travel photos at one of my local art galleries, I jumped at the chance to submit. I couldn't have been more excited a few weeks later when I found out that five of my photographs were chosen to be part of the exhibit! 

Show Me Something I Don’t Know was displayed at the U of A Museums Galleries at Enterprise Square for about three months in early 2016, and contained photographs from all over the world that documented "modern-day travel adventures." The idea was to give visitors to the gallery a chance to experience new places through the traveller's lens and personal point of view. Over 100 photographers from all over the world had work displayed. 

These are the photos that I had in the exhibit, and the descriptions for each that were included in the catalogue. 

1. (Top of the post) The perspective of this photo takes me right back to the early morning ride I took on the back of a motorcycle in Marrekesh.

2. I stepped out of my hot tent in the middle of the Sahara Desert and the first thing that I saw was our camels basking in the early morning sun — it was the perfect reminder that I was in a totally different world and on an incredible adventure! 

3. The moment I saw this incredible temple reflected in its moat, it took my breath away. Up close, it is covered in hundreds of carved faces, now cracked and overgrown with moss. From a distance, it is something to discover, to be explored, and this photo always reminds me that there is always a new adventure out there for me to have.

4. Observing locals and catching them in a moment is the best way to sense the essence of a place.

5. I had travelled all day to get to Angkor Wat in order to see the sunset from the top of the temple. Out of breath from climbing, I turned a corner and captured this monk walking swiftly down the corridor. This image always reminds me of the way I felt in that moment — truly alive. 

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Visiting Monet's Water Lilies At The Musee De L'Orangerie In Paris

by Lindsay Shapka in , , , ,


One of my favourite gallery or museum spaces in the world, the Musee De L'Orangerie is located in Paris on the southwest corner of the Jardin Des Tuileries.

The last time I was in Paris, I was determined to visit smaller museums and locations in the city that had little-to-no mention in tourists books.

That is how I came across this incredible place. 

While it has an impressive collection of Impressionist works, the most incredible part about this gallery is the two, huge white oval rooms that were built in 1927, to Monet's specifications, to display his eight-panel series, Decorations des Nympheas, or Water Lilies

I had no idea what to expect when I walked into the museum, but what I was met with is one of the most unique, peaceful, and inspiring displays of art that I have ever seen.

The shape of the room gives an unending view, allowing people to stand in the middle and be surrounded by Monet's beautiful work.

The lighting is perfect, the crowd quiet, and I ended up spending well over an hour moving back and forth between the two rooms, taking in Monet's brushstrokes, and observing other's enjoy the work

This museum should be on any art lovers must-visit list in Paris — I can't wait to go back! 

Here's what you need to know to plan your visit: 

Musee De L'Orangerie: Jardin des Tuileries, Place de la Concorde, 75001
Open: Wed – Mon 9 am – 6 pm
Admission: 9 Euros (free on the first Sunday of each month)

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Picasso's Woman In A Mantilla

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


La Salchichona 1917 — Picasso             Museu Picasso, Barcelona, Spain

This stunning work by Picasso is housed in the Museu Picasso in Barcelona.

I was completely enchanted by this work when I came upon it while walking through the museum one afternoon. It is oversized, and unlike anything that I had ever seen before — by Picasso or any other artist for that matter. 

When I was a child, my mother said to me, ‘If you become a soldier, you’ll be a general. If you become a monk, you’ll end up as the Pope.’ Instead, I became a painter and wound up as Picasso.
— Pablo Picasso

The gaze of the women depicted is striking and seems to look right through you, but my favourite part of the piece is the obvious difference between the painted and unpainted sections.

Whether it was meant to be left this way or is unfinished, I don't know, but it is a breathtaking work that gives incredible insight into the artist's process.