Why You Need To Visit The Gothenburg Museum of Art In Sweden

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


I recently paid a visit to The Gothenburg Museum of Art (aka Göteborgs Konstmuseum) in Sweden and was blown away by the incredible collection housed in this Swedish art gallery. The space contains an eclectic mix of historic works, Scandinavian art, contemporary sculptures, paintings by famous western artists, new work, and more.

The gallery spaces themselves are as unique as the work that they contain, making you feel like you are moving between buildings rather than just between floors.

The transition spaces between the galleries are also utilized in unique ways. Hallways are filled with collages of portraits (above), stairwells contain unique installations (first image below), and alcoves are the home of both historic and contemporary sculptures (second image below). 

Archive, 2014 by Michael Johansson

Double Blind, 2009/2014 by Charlotte Gyllenhammar

I was lucky enough to visit the museum during a weekday which meant that I was alone in most of the galleries. The sculpture gallery (below) was an especially impressive sight to behold. Turning the corner from the stairwell, you are faced with a vast room with a checkerboard floor that is filled with unique, large-scale pieces.

I was also surprised to see some incredible pieces by famous artists like Picasso, Munch, and Degas, as well as works that I had never seen before painted with a stunning use of light in the Scandinavian tradition. 

Youth from Gosol, 1906 by Pablo Picasso
Picasso's early work is my favourite. Most of these pieces are largely unknown, but the unfinished quality gives insight into the artist's process that I find fascinating and beautiful. 

Nordic Summer Evening, 1899-1900 by Richard Bergh

One of the best parts about the museum?

It's free to visit!

If you want to see the special, seasonal exhibition, there is a small charge, but you can see the majority of the collection without spending a single krona. 




Artist Chris Cran's Fascinating Paintings of Modern History

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


House Head, 2009; Red Man/Black Cartoon, 1990; Awake, 2009

Award-winning Canadian artist Chris Cran has his work displayed in private and public collections all over the world, and it's easy to see why.

His painted work — which he has been creating prolifically for the last 40 years — takes traditional art genres and turns them on their head. Still-life, portraiture and landscape works suddenly become oversized, avant-garde works of brilliance.

The artist is clearly drawn to the Pop and Modernest movements which he uses to portray history in a pop-culture context that can be both hilarious and unsettling at the same time.  

Self-Portrait Just Two Maos Down from some Guy With a Goddamned Tea Cosy On His Head, 1985; Self-Portrait Watching a Man about to Shoot Himself In The Foot, 1985

In 1989, Cran began his Stripe Paintings series where he used a stencilling technique to draw lines on images that he had taken from magazines, art history, and advertising. He also integrated half-tone tones in the imagery as well. 

The process for each work involved blowing the images up from their half-inch scale to over nine feet in some cases. Though paintings, they look almost like pixelated photos that have become grainy because they have been enlarged larger than their resolution allowed.   

Large Orange Laughing Woman, 1991; Large Green Laughing Man, 1990; Large Pink Laughing Man, 1991; Large Green Woman, 1991

Large Orange Laughing Woman, 1991

Large Green Woman, 1991

Smoker, 1989

Hand Gesture, 1992; Hand Gesture #6 (OK), 1992 




Painted Pixels: Modern Art by South Korean Artist Sea Hoon

by Lindsay Shapka in , ,


One by Sea Hoon            Insa Art Centre, Seoul

Jeoung, Sea Hoon, an amazing artist from South Korea, paints in a remarkable style called pointillism. Pointillism is a term that was derived in the 1880s to ridicule the artists who were using the new technique at the time (Seurat, Van Gogh and Pissarro to name a few).

It describes a specific style of brushwork that involves small, distinct dots of pure color applied in patterns to form an image.

ellow by Sea Hoon            Insa Art Centre, Seoul

Resembling modern day pixels on a computer screen, this technique relies on the viewer’s ability to blend the spots together in their mind in order to see a fuller range of tones.

This way of applying paint is in sharp contrast to the more traditional method of blending pigments with fluid brushstrokes and, even today, there are few artists that use this technique.

Sea Hoon uses pointillism masterfully, creating works that are vibrant, alive, full of energy, and look like painted pixels.  

Blue by Sea Hoon            Insa Art Centre, Seoul